Domestic violence protection orders explained

Domestic violence protection orders explained

If you’re experiencing domestic or family violence, a domestic violence protection order can help protect you.

Domestic violence protection orders explained

What is a domestic violence protection order?

A domestic violence protection order is made by a magistrate to protect people living in domestic and family violence situations. The person who the order protects is called the aggrieved. The person who the order is made against is called the respondent. The respondent must adhere to the conditions of the order. If they do not adhere to the conditions, it is called a breach. A breach must be reported to the police.

Who can apply for a domestic violence protection order?

Anyone who is experiencing violence in a relationship can apply for a domestic violence protection order. This includes intimate partner relationships (husband, wife, de facto, fiance, couple) as well as family relationships (parent, former parent, child over 18 or other relative over 18) and informal care relationships (carers).

What is domestic violence?

Domestic and family violence does not always have to be physical. Under Queensland Law domestic violence is defined as: physically or sexually abusive, emotionally or psychologically abusive, threatening, coercive, or any other way that controls or dominates the other person and causes that person to fear for their safety or wellbeing or that of someone else.

READ MORE: Types of domestic abuse

What happens if there’s a breach?

A breach is when the respondent does anything that he/she is prohibited from doing as stated in the protection order. If this occurs the aggrieved should advise the police.